You can access a severance pay template in our library with church forms, documents, and job descriptions. Anyone who has ever had to quit a church employee understands the challenge of having a very difficult conversation. However, you can reduce the blow by creating a redundancy package that shows the love of Christ and helps fill the employment gap. At the end of the day, if there is no budget, you probably won`t be able to support the package. However, if an employee is invited to leave and the salary is already in the church`s budget, extending the employee`s salary for a few weeks or months may not be a deal breaker. While this is not a required benefit, sometimes it is the right thing to do, regardless of why an employee leaves their job. Churches, in particular, should at least consider offering severance pay to a worker who leaves involuntarily because most Church employees are not entitled to unemployment benefits. Their package is very different from a collaborator who has worked less than a year in the organization compared to someone who has been working for the Church for a decade or better. In any case, a Church undergoing pastoral separation should take into deep consideration the legal implications and manage the emotional and spiritual well-being of the former pastor and the remaining collaborators and communities throughout the process. Pastoral separation, especially involuntary resignation, is fraught with legal implications and public relations nightmares if not handled properly, and an experienced canon law lawyer should be consulted.

It is also worth checking the pastoral employment contract and/or letter of offer to begin the interviews, as some provisions may be transferred initially. This article focuses specifically on one aspect of the pastoral process of separation: the separation convention and its implications. In the event of an amicable separation, the Church may have weeks or months to compensate for a well-developed agreement, a communication plan, and an approach to the ongoing care of the outgoing pastor. In other less friendly situations, the Church may not have that luxury. That is why we recommend preparing beforehand for the possibility of pastoral separation. Spend a few weeks discussing some of these topics and where your direction in general is. Turn to a lawyer experienced in canon law to establish a draft standard separation agreement that corresponds to your ecclesiastical culture in general, so that you are ready to intervene more quickly in the worst case of involuntary termination. . . .